THE DOS AND DON’TS OF SUBMITTING TO LIT MAGS AND COMPETITIONS

Write a thing. Submit a thing. Get published. Yes.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ (see reviews)

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Straightforward and informative. Fully involved with the important aspects of submissions. For beginners and pros alike. A good aide memoir for now and the years to come.
- Gerald Ezard

Part of the WHQ membership

Super quick course, rolling access

Join our kickass community

COURSE HOME

Thinking of sending your writing out into the literary ether? Hooray! Welcome to the wonderful world of submissions – simultaneously the most rewarding and frustrating part of being a writer. Hahaaa… <sob>

There are some truly brilliant writing competitions and lit mags out there, but it can be all too easy to commit the cardinal sins of submission, cock up your chances at getting published, and become defeated by rejection.

BUT WAIT.

We’ve put together a handy list of fundamental dos and don’ts for submitting your precious storybabies to writing competitions, literary magazines and the like. For example:

  • How to properly prepare your submissions and give yourself a decent chance at getting published
  • How not to piss off hard-working lit mag editors and competition judges
  • How to keep going in the face of rejection
  • How not to succumb to imposter syndrome and fear of failure
  • How to kick literary arse with your subs

So take note, take heed, and get freakin’ published.

CURRICULUM

Part 1
Read the fucking guidelines

Part 2
Do your research

Part 3
Proofread and edit your work

Part 4
Make sure your story has a point

Day 5
Be patient (AKA get used to waiting)

Part 6
Keep track of your subs

Part 7
Don’t put yourself down or sell yourself short

Part 8
Keep. On. Truckin’.

HOW IT WORKS

1. Enrol
Once you’ve joined you’ll get an email confirming your place and explaining how you access the course. Spoiler: you click a link. Super simple.

2. Read, watch, do
This is a super mini masterclass made up of a mix of text, images and stupid gifs. To get the most out of the course, try to give yourself at least an hour a day to read or watch the material and do the exercises. We’ve made them as bite-size as possible but also if you wanna do the thing you gotta do the work.

3. No rush
This course is in eight parts but if you miss a part or something comes up, don’t panic! Go at your own pace. We’ll be waiting for you in the community forums when you’re ready to catch up.

4. No money? No problem
Periodically we run this course as a freebie so please make sure you’re on our newsletter list to get notifications of that. Alternatively, if you can’t wait and have no cash, have a look at our bursary scheme.

5. Milk no sugar
Drink plenty of tea, stock up on biscuits, gin for later. Enjoy it. It’s supposed to be fun. Love you. Mwa.

WHAT YOU GET
  • This course is exclusive for members, so when you join you get access to all our amaaazing creative writing courses, including this one, which is an 8-part turbo course on submissions etiquette full of tips and tricks on submitting to lit mags and competition
  • Pep talks on overcoming the fear of rejection, dealing with actual rejection, and managing your subs.
  • Access to our private forum full of super cool people to help and support you along the way, including Team WHQ, our specially-pickled and hand-baked gang of badass writers.

Learn what to do (and what NOT to do) in the wild, wild west of Submissionsland.

Get prepped and pepped to send your writing out into the big wide world…

Join our lovely little online community to support you through starting, middling, finishing and beyond.

LOVE FOR WRITERS’ HQ

…well, the best thing ever editing-wise. My novel’s been stuck in the doldrums for ages and I was losing heart, knowing it wasn’t right, but not knowing how to identify what was wrong, far less having a clue as to how to go about fixing it. But now I do, and that’s really exciting and invigorating. The course is clearly laid out in small, bite-sized chunks. It’s all really well signposted, so you know what you need to do every week, why you need to do it, and how to do it. It’s laid out in a logical order. It takes things one step at a time. It’s completely bargainous. Jo and Sarah are friendly and down-to-earth and they explain things in the way you would talk to your friends down the pub and not as if you’re in a university lecture. I really can’t fault the course, nor can I recommend it enough.

Annie Kirby

Plotstormers II: The Editing Strikes Back

Detailed and easy and fun to follow ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I’ve only just started, but I can tell this course and the group is going to help, especially as I’ve done more short story courses than I can remember.

Jacqui Dickson

Writing Short Fiction

Best f**king course on writing short fiction, ever ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I love this course. So much information, so many great exercises, such great feedback in the forums. Doesn’t matter how you learn – there’s a little something for everyone here, from videos to suggested readings to hands-on work – and some great prompts for the exercises. Helped me think about writing in invaluable new ways (distill your story down to a 140-character tweet? I can do this, I can do this…!). Kind, encouraging, clear, direct. I wrote some new stories during the course, and with the stories I already had before I started, I have lots of editing ahead of me….but at least now I KNOW WHAT TO DO! Thanks for a stellar course, Jo. Time now to stop f**king about and start editing (writing is rewriting :o).

Mary Taslimi

Writing Short Fiction

The short and the long of it ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

There is a huge amount of material in this course, compactly delivered in six weekly batches of units. As well as plenty of straightforward instruction on the craft of storytelling (plot, character, point of view, and whatnot) there are diverse readings to ponder and discuss; soundbites and advice from writers and editors; prompts and challenging exercises; and a chance to post your own writing for feedback from the forum. I highly recommend it as an introduction to the world of short stories, and as food for thought on writing in general which may take me far longer than six weeks to digest.

Rosemary Sgroi

Writing Short Fiction

TUTORS

Sarah Lewis
Half of Writers’ HQ
Procrastinator Level: Set up WHQ and had a baby to avoid writing her novel

Jo Gatford
Half of Writers’ HQ
Procrastinator Level: Set up WHQ and did an MA to avoid writing her novel

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Writing Short Fiction
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Publishing 101: Find An Agent
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